I’ve been reading Brian Dillon’s “Suppose A Sentence” and wondering why we write the way we write. In 27 essays, Dillon vivisects 27 sentences, beginning with Shakespeare and ending somewhere in the present day. He makes it his mission to examine why these sentences work so well…
In the Guardian Long Read last week, I wrote about a skirmish at Wentworth Golf Club in Surrey, between the club’s longtime members and its new owner, …
Samanth Subramanian
In a multi-storied issue a few months ago, I ventured that perhaps one purpose of this newsletter might be to send you some of my older writing that is…
Samanth Subramanian
In December, for an end-of-year package put together by Rest of World, I wrote about a woman who was raped and killed in the fields in Hathras, a distr…
Samanth Subramanian
Earlier this year, an editor from Granta asked if I could contribute to their Winter 2020 issue, titled “Second Nature.” She knew what she wanted: a pi…
Samanth Subramanian
I am sure I am not alone in having wondered again and again over the past decade, over the tenures of various governments in India, the UK and the US: …
Samanth Subramanian
In September, after months and months, I took an international flight again: London to Florence, two-hours-and-a-bit, the kind of low-cost hop that so …
Samanth Subramanian
A couple of weeks ago, The Economist’s feature-magazine sister 1843 published my profile of Jimmy Anderson, the most successful fast bowler in the hist…
Samanth Subramanian
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